Kubo and the Two Strings

September 12, 2016

I have to be honest, my favorite part of this may have been the first line:  “If you must blink, do it now.” It’s a storyteller’s first line — main character Kubo is a storyteller, and the line gets repeated twice more through the movie. As an attention-getting intro, it worked splendidly, and I started thinking about the idea of a one-sentence prologue.  A single line that’s sharp enough to hook a reader, that may not necessarily flow straight into the next line or even the rest of the story.  A storyteller’s summons.  “I sing of arms and the man…”  So I do appreciate any piece of art/creativity that gets me thinking about technique and purpose and art in general, and the serendipity of encountering a piece of art that starts me thinking in a new direction that may impact my own work. How these chance encounters can sometimes become so meaningful.

The film itself had a lot of visual impact. The story was a little rote, a little predictable, and a little too long — most scenes dragged just a little bit. There seemed to be an impulse to make each battle a little longer, each character interaction a little slower, to show off the animation. The overall pacing suffered, I think.  And one finds oneself asking the question of why does a Japanese story set in Japan have an all-white primary cast?

It’s a decent movie, really. I wasn’t disappointed. But I wasn’t blown away, either. Except by that first line.

 

revision revision revision

September 9, 2016

Well, I did take an hour off to go to yoga. Ah, happy rubbery muscles.

Look what came in the mail this week!

asimovs-and-years-best

Busy busy busy!

 

work day

September 7, 2016

I thought about where I had to be today and the answer was: no where. I don’t have to be anywhere. That felt a little weird. So I guess that’s back to work with me!

I have a week to turn in revisions on Bannerless. I’ve been pecking away at it and it’s just about time for the final read through. Occupying a lot of mental energy.

And that is why I don’t really have a fancy blog post today.  I have a lot of topics for fancy blog posts written down, but actually writing them will have to wait for later, when I’m not neck deep in this thing.

Just gotta keep going. . .

 

I spent the weekend camping (SCA event), and so am spending another Monday catching up on sleep, doing laundry, and staving off a cold.  All this traveling, and I’ve managed to not come down with con crud or camping crud or anything.  Let’s see if I can keep healthy!

Things that happened:

  • Saw the biggest spider that wasn’t a tarantula I’ve ever seen, and I would have been fascinated — if it had not been in my tent, inches from my bed.  I managed to get it outside without killing either of us.
  • I learned to make lampworked beads.  Not sure this is something I’ll add to my list of hobbies, but it’s nice to work on getting over my fear of Crafts Involving Fire. (Long story, there.)

In other news:

  • The September issue of Asimov’s Science Fiction has my story “The Mind is Its Own Place.” This story has a lot of history to it — I wrote the first version maybe 12 years ago?  15?  I sent it out and it never sold.  Well, last year I pulled it out again — and knew how to fix it.  So I did.  I can’t tell you how gratifying it is to have proof that I’m clearly a better writer than I was 15 years ago.
  • Hex Publishers’ online zine WORDS has reprinted my story “Letter From Nancy.”

And now, I think I need to get some groceries so I can actually eat.  Until the next trip, in just two week.  Yikes!

 

Martians Abroad!

September 2, 2016

I don’t think I’ve posted the cover for my next book yet:

MartiansAb

Art by Paul Youll.  Release date:  January 17, 2017.  It’s been a long time coming but here it is!  Polly is a third-generation Martian colonist whose mother sends her and her twin brother to Earth for boarding school.  And she isn’t at all happy about it. . .

Available for pre-order from all the usual suspects:  IndieBound, Amazon, B&N.

Woohoo, it’s a book!

 

 

I’m that one person who’s going to be a curmudgeon about Stranger Things.

I think the thing runs about three episodes too long.  There’s maybe 7 pounds of story poured into a 10 pound bag.  There’s some good stuff, for sure (Winona Ryder acting circles around just about everyone else, for one).  But there’s a lot of repetition, a lot of dragging, a lot of places where I laughed instead of being scared (seriously, you hook a tow-cable up to a guy we’ve never seen before and then send him into the dimensional rift, that tow cable’s gonna be coming back with nothing attached to it in just a couple minutes), and a lot of me being just plain frustrated by characters acting according to a checklist and not like believable characters.  I confess my expectations were likely unduly raised by the enthusiastic online reaction to the show.  And just didn’t feel that.

Some background.  I learned RPG gaming at the University of York with a very talented group that did things like entirely make up their own games and play without systems, using only percentage dice and common sense and good storytelling.  One of the first games I played there was part of a one-off intro day of gaming. The game was original, we were allowed to pick our own characters (I believe from a list of choices), with the stipulation that the game was going to be fun and goofy. I was a North Pole Elf, for example.  High points in construction, engineering, and speed.

One of the other players chose Stephen King Child Protagonist.  This was oh-so-clever, because it pretty much assured he would live to the end of the game, and he could reasonably argue to acquire any number of arcane abilities over the course of events.  I don’t actually remember very much of what happened except that it was fast-paced and hilarious and skewered a bunch of the tropes we had all grown up with.

We played this game in 1993.  That the phrase “Stephen King Child Protagonist” could be uttered twenty three years ago and everyone knew exactly what that entailed means that the territory Stranger Things is covering is not only not new, it’s entirely familiar.  In fact, the show depends on it.

I question if the enormously positive response is not necessarily to the quality of the story but to the recognition of the familiar.  The validation of speaking and understanding a specific language — of past genre tropes and accoutrements, in this case.  So much of the point of allusion and referencing in pop culture is about that marvelous moment of recognition, of feeling part of the culture described by the piece.

It’s very nice to feel part of the club.  But is the show good?  I mean, what is Stranger Things about?  Is it maybe actually about “let’s make a perfect replica of a 1980’s Stephen King/Spielberg/kid-centric adventure story using modern production values?”  That’s not a story, that’s historical re-enactment.

Because by god that Trapper Keeper in the locker was front and center on that one shot, to make sure we didn’t miss it. (Yes, I once owned a Trapper Keeper.  It was gray with kittens on it.)  An actual thought I had during Ep. 7: “I swear to god if those bicycles start flying I am rage quitting this right here.”  The bikes did not fly, which maybe means the creators knew exactly how far they could push their conceit before crossing too far into pastiche.

And why doesn’t the show seem to care much about Barb?  Well, because she’s a trope.  She’s meant to be an inversion of that 80’s slasher movie thing where the girl who has sex gets killed by the monster/slasher/whatever.  But in this case, the girl who has sex, Nancy, lives; and the plain-Jane good-girl friend is violently killed.

And then the show forgets about her because she’s already served her purpose.  The show’s creators are apparently startled that people really like Barb and are really upset that no one in town, not the chief of police, not Barb’s mother — and Nancy only tangentially, as an aside, like “Oh yeah I guess I need to be sad about that” — seems to care that Barb is gone.  Meanwhile, the school is having assemblies and funerals and Feelings Galore for Will.  It’s a failure of realism.  It’s a failure of common sense.  (There are quite a few of these throughout.)   You know what would have fixed that arc for me?  A thirty second scene:  Joyce brings back Barb’s glasses or a scrap of her shirt, presses them into Nancy’s hand and says a sincere, heartfelt, “I’m sorry.”  That’s it.

(If I were going to be uncharitable and paranoid, I would say Barb gets forgotten because she has no connection to any of the men in the story.  Because as strong and interesting as the women characters are, they are all of them defined by their relationships to the men around them.  Barb just has Nancy, and Nancy doesn’t have enough agency to do much about Barb, because her arc is all about what boy she likes, amirite?  Seriously, the scene where Nancy actually does go looking for Barb is mainly about her spending time with Jonathan, and then setting up the scene where Steve thinks she’s cheating on him.  But thinking that would be uncharitable and paranoid, wouldn’t it?)

So is Stranger Things good, or is it familiar?  Your mileage may vary.  But thank god those damned bicycles didn’t fly.

 

I wrote a play!

August 29, 2016

I wrote a play.  A short play, about 15 minutes or so, called “Simulation.”  The theater department at Linfield College in McMinneville, OR, where my brother works as TD will be staging it in a few weeks, Sept 22-24.

It’s so exciting because Rob and I did a bunch of theater together in high school (I have a picture of us somewhere in South Pacific — he was a singing dancing sailor and I was a singing dancing nurse), and we’ve talked for years about working on a show together that I would write.  And now it’s happening, at least on a small scale.  Maybe the start of something bigger?  Hmmm….

I’m planning on being there for the performances.  If you’re in the area — you’re invited, too!  For more information check out the Linfield Theater Dept. website.

linfield 2016 season