what my bad moods look like

September 30, 2016

It turns out I was in a pretty bad mood for part of this week, so I left the house and went out to get some air and burn off some energy.

This is what I came home with.  And I looked at the haul and went, “Holy cow, that really was a bad mood.”

But I started catching up on season 2 of Mr. Robot and I feel much better now.  How about that best actor Emmy win for Rami Malek?! So good!

bad-day-gin

always catching up

September 28, 2016

This has been an entire summer of running around having adventures and then trying to catch up between adventures. Not quite finished yet. I’m doing a round of clean-up revisions on Bannerless, plus making my niece’s Halloween costume, plus getting ready for winter, and so on and so on.  I have a dive trip scheduled for November, so maybe that will be when I finally let go of this low-grade worry I’m carrying around right now.  We’ll see.

In the meantime, I dipped into some reality TV and discovered that TLC found a way to make Toddlers and Tiaras even more awful than it already was:  break the kids into teams and pit them against each other.  Actually, it’s more like the mothers getting pitted against each other, resulting in a show primarily about grown women acting like 12 year old mean girls.  I kept asking myself:  Do these women realize that the whole point of this show is to make them look like horrible, horrible people?  Do they care?  Or do they genuinely think this is a path to fame and riches?  Because that path has worked out so well for so many other people, I guess?

A favorite saying among authors:  if I put this in a book, no one would believe it.

 

I’m back from Oregon and the premier of my very first play, “Simulation.”  Now there’s an experience to check off the list!  I had a great time, and only had a slight nervous breakdown a couple of hours before opening night.  “But will people like it!” I kept whining.  Then, during the performance, people laughed right when they were supposed to, at a joke I was afraid that only I thought was funny, and everything was okay from then on.

I got to see a dress rehearsal and all three performances, and took part in talk-back sessions after each performance. I’m so glad I was able to be there. The actors and director did a great job taking my work, interpreting it and making it their own, which is exactly what I hoped would happen.

So, all in all, this was a great experience and I’m grateful to the Linfield College Theater Department, Ty, Brenda, Janet, Rob, the actors, and director Chris Forrar, for making it happen.

Rob and I are already talking about what we can do next…

 

happy autumn!

September 23, 2016

First full day of autumn. The leaves are turning. The heater is coming on at night.

I’m not sure I’m ready for this.

 

“Simulation” World Premiere

September 21, 2016

Gosh, that sounds exciting, doesn’t it?  Yes, the world premiere of my one-act play, “Simulation,” is happening at Linfield College in Oregon this weekend, and I’ll be on hand to talk about the play and the topics surrounding it.

Performances are September 22, 23, and 24 at 7:30 pm.  For more information and to buy tickets, see the website.

I really hope people like it.  Nervous new playwright is nervous.

 

happy Monday

September 19, 2016

The Best of Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Year Seven is out now and includes my story, “Sun, Stone, Spear.”  This is my neolithic fantasy, filled with standing stones and encounters with demons and gods.  I really want to do more with this setting. And the whole concept of neolithic epic fantasy, really.  It’s on the list.

It’s been a long couple of weeks, finishing up the revisions to Bannerless, recovering after the month of travel, hanging out with visiting friends, and putting my brain back together.  Trying to clean the place up some, you know?  Also, catching up on 50th anniversary Star Trek showings.  Been a long time since I saw “The Trouble with Tribbles” and I’d forgotten just how hysterically funny it is.  Oh my goodness.  Tribbles clinging to walls will never not be funny.

One thing I want to do in my down time:  get out to Walden Ponds to see what’s stopped by on fall migration. That’s the spot that got me back into birding and there always seem to be a ton of waterbirds this time of year. I need a duck fix.  Wait, that sounded weird…

 

Labyrinth — 30th Anniversary

September 16, 2016

This week I got to see Labyrinth on the big screen for the first time since it came out. At least, I’m assuming I saw it on the big screen when it was new — I actually don’t remember.  But I’m assuming I did since I’ve always, always loved it.

This is such a special movie. Not just because it’s simple and yet filled with depth, but it’s a collaboration between so many creative geniuses, who are clearly enamored with the project, and all that magic comes through.

I understand this is a cleaned up/restored version, and it shows.  The colors.  The lining of Jareth’s cloak is a deep sparkling blue, and I never noticed that before. The goblins’ eyes glow red when the light hits them right.  Much of the landscape of the Labyrinth has this sparkling sheen that’s been muted for 30 years, and now isn’t.  There’s apparently a 30th anniversary Blu-ray available. I might need that. (Even though I already own like three copies of this movie.)

And Jareth.  My God.  The audience cheered at his first appearance. He fills the screen.  But what struck me this viewing (besides the fact that I’m always seeing new and wonderful things in the movie) is how much that character is a warning.  This is a coming of age story.  A big part of it is Sarah leaving childhood behind and growing up. And yes, there’s a sexual component to that, and it’s almost entirely driven by Jareth.  But he’s a warning:  there are beautiful, beautiful men who will promise you the world.  But they steal babies. They’re not good.  Parse that sentence:  “Let me rule you and I will be your slave.”  Which is it? Can’t do both.  Yes, this beautiful powerful man is offering to give you all your dreams.  And it will only cost yourself, your own will.  Sarah, just entering adulthood, will recognize that, now.

I love Jareth because he shows us that villains can be beautiful.  They aren’t always ugly. They aren’t necessarily destructive.  But they’re still villains.  I got to thinking:  Is there anyone now who could play Jareth? Who could get across that sense of beauty and power and danger and charisma?  Has there ever been anyone who could play that character like Bowie did?  Hollywood has lots and lots of pretty boys.  But how many pretty, powerful men are there?  The mature fae?

(Pause for much weeping and grief for the loss of Bowie.)

Sarah is also a really great character, and another data point on how I think in many cases the 80’s did just fine with women characters.  She’s smart, driven, motivated, has agency, learns, and is generally wonderful.  At some point I also really want to talk about grief in the story — part of Sarah’s coming of age is moving through grief and letting go of her mother.  The film’s hints of this are so, so subtle — the clippings in her scrapbook and on her mirror show a beautiful dark haired woman who is clearly an actress, and I think the one who imparted a love of costumes and fantasy and make-believe to Sarah.  But she’s gone now.  Did she die? Did she leave?  We don’t know. But at the end of the film, Sarah starts pulling those clippings down and putting them away.  The movie never talks about this thread explicitly.  And I absolutely love that it never does.  I don’t think it’s the main part of the movie — it’s just one of many threads in Sarah’s life. I like that there’s a puzzle to figure out.

Gah, yes, I could talk about this movie for ages.  I loved that there were parents with kids in the theater. I hope it means that love for this movie will be around for a long long time.